Category Archives: Coping

Study: Higher Income is Related to Less Daily Sadness but Not More Daily Happiness

money can't buy happiness

A new large-scale study of over 12,000 participants shows that higher income is associated with less daily sadness but not more daily happiness (Kushlev, Dunn, & Lucas, 2015). Continue reading

People Who Are Consciously Aware of Their Emotions Deal With Them More Effectively, Study Shows

emotions

How aware of your emotions are you?

People who are consciously aware of their emotions deal with them more effectively. This idea is supported by a recent survey study by Claudia Subic-Wrana and co-workers (2014) of almost 2,000 participants (a representative sample of the German general population). Continue reading

12 Common Irrational Beliefs

thinking

Dr. Albert Ellis was a practitioner of rational emotive behavior therapy. During his time as a therapist, he identified 12 irrational beliefs that many people have. Continue reading

Connect With Nature, See Its Beauty, and Improve Your Well-Being, Research Shows

nature

One touch of nature makes the whole world kin. – William Shakespeare

Connectedness with nature has been associated with greater well-being, but how exactly does connectedness with nature improve well-being?  Continue reading

Psychological Resilience: The Ability to Turn Stressful Life Events Into Personal Growth

ice climbing

Perceiving life events as opportunities for personal growth rather than limitations or threats to security will make you endure even the most challenging aspects of life.

Resilience characterizes people who are able to interact with their environments in ways that promote growth and well-being, despite they may have been exposed to many challenging life events or psychological risk factors. That said, life is by itself a stressful phenomenon. Continue reading

Study: Feel Bad to Feel Great (Relief Boosts Positive Emotions)

Relief is one of the most common emotions, and it is one of our few basic emotions. Most of our emotions have clear emotional valences. For example, happiness is considered to have a positive emotional valence; anger is considered to have a negative valence; and arousal is considered to have a neutral valence.

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10 Factors that Influence Help-Seeking Behaviors

In the book Medical Sociology written by David Mechanic (1978), a thorough theory of help‐seeking behavior is provided. The theory emphasizes individual differences in help-seeking behaviors. In other words, why do some people seek help, while others don’t? Continue reading

Study: Urban Green Spaces Lower People’s Frustration and Stress

central park

What is the relationship between the environment, behaviour and emotions? What kinds of environments will make us happy? Environmental psychologists try to answer this question. Continue reading