Category Archives: Clinical Psychology

Write Down Your Thoughts to Become More Mindful and Consciously Aware

write it down

Do you make shopping lists? Do you use your calendar for planning? Or do you otherwise tend to write down your thoughts? Good! Writing things down can help you become more mindful and consciously aware. Continue reading

People Who Are Consciously Aware of Their Emotions Deal With Them More Effectively, Study Shows

emotions

How aware of your emotions are you?

People who are consciously aware of their emotions deal with them more effectively. This idea is supported by a recent survey study by Claudia Subic-Wrana and co-workers (2014) of almost 2,000 participants (a representative sample of the German general population). Continue reading

A 100-Year Old Word Repetition Technique is Effective in Reducing the Impact of (Negative) Words

words

Repeat the word milk for 45 seconds or more (remember to say it out loud), and you will find that the word begins to lose its meaning. It’s called the Milk Milk Milk exercise, and it is just one of many word repetition exercises. Try it yourself before you read any further… did the word milk lose its meaning? Continue reading

Study: Anxious Parents May Attribute Negative Emotions to Their Children

Anxiety runs in families. Children of anxious parents are over five times more likely than those of non-anxious parents to have an anxiety disorder (Budinger et al., 2013). Continue reading

Study: Vacations Decrease Work-Related Stress, Especially in “Obsessive” Workers

vacation

Vacations provide an opportunity for relaxation and mental downtime.

The summer vacations have just ended for most people. So, you might wonder how long you benefit from the effects of your holiday? Ought we go on holidays to relieve work-related stress and to stay well? Continue reading

12 Common Irrational Beliefs

thinking

Dr. Albert Ellis was a practitioner of rational emotive behavior therapy. During his time as a therapist, he identified 12 irrational beliefs that many people have. Continue reading

A DSM-5 Definition of Avoidant Personality Disorder

avoidant personality disorder

Avoidant personality disorder is especially prevalent in people with anxiety disorders, social anxiety in particular.

Avoidant Personality Disorder (APD) is in the newest American diagnostic manual (DSM-5) characterized by impairments in two domains of personality functioning: self and interpersonal functioning. Continue reading

Connect With Nature, See Its Beauty, and Improve Your Well-Being, Research Shows

nature

One touch of nature makes the whole world kin. – William Shakespeare

Connectedness with nature has been associated with greater well-being, but how exactly does connectedness with nature improve well-being?  Continue reading