Category Archives: Clinical Psychology

Are You In Control? Feelings of Personal Control Are Essential for Mental Health

Feeling out of control?

The belief that one can exert control over stressful events has long been known to help people cope with stress (Taylor, 2012). People like to have control over their lives, and people who have a sense of personal control seem to be better off than those who haven’t.

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Study: Sleep Disturbances Predict the Course of Anxiety and Depressive Disorders

In a study by Van Mill and colleagues (2013), the authors examined the impact of sleep disturbances on the course of anxiety and depressive disorders. The sleep durations of over 1,000 individuals with depressive and/or anxiety disorders, over a period of two years, were examined. Continue reading

Soda Consumption May Cause Behavioural Problems in Children

Soda consumption may have a negative impact on children’s behaviours such as aggression, attention and withdrawal.

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How the Brain Responds to Traumatic Events that Later Become Flashbacks

How the brain responds to a traumatic event predicts whether that event becomes a flashback.

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Anxiety Runs in Families: How Parenting Promotes Anxiety

anxiety

Parenting contributes to the development of anxiety.

Budinger and colleagues (2013) state that children of anxious parents are over five times more likely than those of non-anxious parents to have an anxiety disorder. Continue reading

Deal With Anxiety by Reframing How You Think About Negative or Anxious Emotions and Situations

Reappraisal of negative or anxious emotions reduces anxiety by providing more positive thoughts and emotions.

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We Invest So Much Time In Mind Wandering, But How Does It Help Us?

Mind wandering may help us by providing an opportunity for self-reflection that allows us to make meaning of our lives.

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Study: People With Self-Discipline Are Happier

self-discipline

When we think of people with a high self-control, we cannot avoid thinking about how restrained and deprived they might be. Whenever we restrain ourselves, we tend to think that we are missing something. Continue reading