Category Archives: Clinical Psychology

The Dynamics of Materialism and Loneliness

loneliness

Will possessions make us happier?

Pieters (2013) did a longitudinal study of more than 2,500 consumers over a period of six years. The author wanted to identify the association between materialism and loneliness. Continue reading

Study: People Who Help Others May Live Longer Compared to People Who Don’t

Help others to help yourself, research shows.

A five-year study by Poulin and colleagues (2013) shows that helping others (such as providing transportation, doing errands, shopping, housework or childcare) is associated with a decreased association between stress and mortality. Continue reading

8 Ways to Deal With Stress and Difficulties (Coping Strategies)

stress

Her way of coping with stress is positive reappraisal.

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Therapist’s Burnout: A Consequence of Severe Mental and Emotional Fatigue

therapist

“The expression that clients “share their trauma” with their therapists is more than a turn of a phrase.” (p. 1529). Continue reading

3 Ways to Prevent that the Moods of Others Affect You Negatively

contagion

People may affect your mood in either a positive or negative way. You might want to avoid that negative moods affect you too much. This post describes how to do it.

The idea of emotional contagion goes back to 400 B.C., when Hippocrates found that some women transferred their strong emotions to others. Continue reading

Meaning in Life Can Be Manipulated by Cognitive Scientists

Jackson Pollock

When we are presented with random stimuli, we report lower degrees of meaning in life, research shows.

The experience of life as meaningful or purposeful is important as it is associated with a higher quality of life, better self-reported health, better occupational adjustment, better adaptive coping, lower incidence of psychological disorders, slower age-related cognitive decline, and decreased mortality (Heintzelman et al., 2013).

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Study: Feel Bad to Feel Great (Relief Boosts Positive Emotions)

Relief is one of the most common emotions, and it is one of our few basic emotions. Most of our emotions have clear emotional valences. For example, happiness is considered to have a positive emotional valence; anger is considered to have a negative valence; and arousal is considered to have a neutral valence.

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10 Factors that Influence Help-Seeking Behaviors

In the book Medical Sociology written by David Mechanic (1978), a thorough theory of help‐seeking behavior is provided. The theory emphasizes individual differences in help-seeking behaviors. In other words, why do some people seek help, while others don’t? Continue reading