Category Archives: Cognitive Bias

The Intuitive and Analytical Thinking Style: Which One is Yours?

Think

The human brain is sophisticated. It separates us from all other animals. It allows us to have abstract ideas and to solve complex problems. We are rational social beings, or are we? Continue reading

The Affect Heuristic: How We Feel is How We Think

distress

When we are upset, we are hardly ever rational. This psychological phenomenon is the affect heuristic.

Do you feel that your emotions control what you think? Or do you find it difficult to be rational when you are emotional? Continue reading

12 Common Irrational Beliefs

thinking

Dr. Albert Ellis was a practitioner of rational emotive behavior therapy. During his time as a therapist, he identified 12 irrational beliefs that many people have. Continue reading

15 Cognitive Biases that Prevent Us From Thinking Rationally

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When we make decisions or judgments, we often use mental shortcuts. The purpose of mental shortcuts is to ease the “cognitive load” of making decisions.

Mental shortcuts are helpful because they allow us to make quick decisions, but sometimes they result in “thinking errors” or so-called cognitive biases. We should be aware of these biases because they prevent us from thinking rationally.

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The Impact Bias: Why We Overestimate the Emotional Impact of Future Events

microphone

This scenario would provoke anxiety in many of us, but research finds that we tend to overestimate the emotional impact of future events.

People often overestimate the intensity and duration of their emotional reactions to future events. This tendency is called the impact bias, which is just one of many cognitive biases. Because of the impact bias, people fail to make the right decisions about their emotional reactions to future events.

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Hindsight Bias: Why We View Events as More Predictable Than They Really Are

hindsight bias

The hindsight bias is one of many cognitive biases, and it is defined as the belief that an event is more predictable after it becomes known than it was before it became known. As a result, people tend to view events are more predictable than they are. Continue reading

Why People Fail to Make Accurate Predictions About Probability

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When we solve problems and make decisions and judgments, we very often use mental shortcuts (so-called heuristics). We use these heuristics if we neither have resources nor time to compare all available information before making a choice. In other words, heuristics ease the cognitive load of making a decision. Continue reading

Time Flies? Life Appears to Speed Up As People Get Older

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