Category Archives: Learning

Negativity Bias: Why Negative Things Stand Out

Positive thinking can feel like a job to do, while negative thinking seems to happen more automatically. In fact, this is true at a very fundamental level of the brain, studies show. It is called the negativity biasContinue reading

The Intuitive and Analytical Thinking Style: Which One is Yours?

Think

The human brain is sophisticated. It separates us from all other animals. It allows us to have abstract ideas and to solve complex problems. We are rational social beings, or are we? Continue reading

Does Brain Training Work or is it a Waste of Time? This is What Research Shows

brain training

Brain training is a hot topic. It’s a million-dollar business and its popularity is still increasing. We have been interested in increasing people’s intelligence since the study of intelligence, but computerized brain training is a relatively new invention. Continue reading

Study: Being in Love is Associated With Reduced Cognitive Control

love

Love is blind, according to Shakespeare and a new study.

What does it mean to fall in love? Continue reading

Moderate Levels of Stress Enhance Learning, While High Levels of Stress Impair Learning

Stress does not always block learning.

A number of studies have examined how stress affects learning and memory, but the literature has shown mixed results.
Continue reading

Even A Fish Can Learn (Aquarium Experiment of Classical Conditioning)

This short video shows how my aquarium fish learned to associate food with the sound of a feeder through classical conditioning. Continue reading

The Brain’s Reward System: Is Dopamine the Only ‘Feel Good’ Chemical?

Much evidence has associated dopamine with the brain’s reward system. For this reason, dopamine has been called the “feel good” or pleasure chemical. Stimulation of the neurotransmitter, dopamine, makes us feel good. Continue reading

Why People Fail to Make Accurate Predictions About Probability

dice

When we solve problems and make decisions and judgments, we very often use mental shortcuts (so-called heuristics). We use these heuristics if we neither have resources nor time to compare all available information before making a choice. In other words, heuristics ease the cognitive load of making a decision. Continue reading