Category Archives: Cognitive Psychology

Mnemonic Devices: The Art of Improving Memory

memory

Do you forget things easily? Try these mnemonic devices.

The deeper we process information, the better we will remember it. It’s as simple as that. Luckily, there is a way to improve our memory, but it takes effortful and intentional processing. This means, if we want to improve our memory, we must practice. Continue reading

Psychology Shows How We Recognize Faces

Whenever we perceive another person, the first things we notice are very general features like gender and age, according to the feature theory of face perception.

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How We Perceive Depth (Monucular and Binocular Depth Cues)

The eye (i.e., the retina) receives sensory input in only two dimensions (length and width). It is therefore the brain’s task to make these cues into a three-dimensional perception. Continue reading

How The Brain Makes Sense of Sensory Stimuli: Bottom-Up and Top-Down Processing

perception

Perception is how the brain makes sense of sensory stimuli: perception is the organization, identification and interpretation of sensory stimuli.

To create our perceptions, the brain makes use of two processing systems, namely the bottom-up and the top-down processing system. Continue reading

The Certainty Effect: Why We Fail at Calculating Probabilities

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Medium Maximization: The Tendency to Focus on Immediate Outcomes

A medium has no value in itself, but it can be traded for another desired outcome. An effort may lead to a medium that, in turn, may lead to an outcome.

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Psychological Myopia: The Tendency to Think Short-Sightedly

decisions

Psychological myopia refers to the tendency in decision makers to focus on information immediately related to their judgment and to ignore other, less prominent, pieces of information. Continue reading

Meaning in Life Can Be Manipulated by Cognitive Scientists

Jackson Pollock

When we are presented with random stimuli, we report lower degrees of meaning in life, research shows.

The experience of life as meaningful or purposeful is important as it is associated with a higher quality of life, better self-reported health, better occupational adjustment, better adaptive coping, lower incidence of psychological disorders, slower age-related cognitive decline, and decreased mortality (Heintzelman et al., 2013).

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