Category Archives: Social Psychology

What is a Self-Fulfilling Prophecy?

Who Win The Promiscuity Battle — Men or Women?

dating

This topic has received much attention over the years, and we all have our assumptions about it, but what does psychological research tell us about gender differences in promiscuity? Continue reading

Do Males and Females Really Communicate in Different Ways?

gender

Why do men and women sometimes find it so difficult to communicate? Do they communicate differently, or is that just a stereotype?

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Humor Connects People: The Laughing and Liking Principle

laughter

“A day without laughter is a day wasted” – Charlie Chaplin

Humor and laughter are prevalent in most people’s daily lives. According to Treger and colleagues (2013), some estimates suggest that we laugh an average of 18 times a day, often in the presence of others. Continue reading

Extreme Political Attitudes are Difficult to Change for 5 Reasons

extreme attitudes

Why is it that some people hold extreme political or religious attitudes? First, we need to understand the nature of such attitudes. Here are two quotes, which I think, emphasize it:

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Can Evolution Explain Why Women Become Attracted by Some Men Over Others?

gentlemen

What makes a man attractive?

Why is it that women prefer some men over others? I guess that many people, especially men, want to know this. In this article, I sum up the evolutionary theory of  sexual selection, and in this context, I consider the findings of recent psychological research. So, can evolution explain mate preferences? Read on.
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Instincts Might Explain Why People Hold Prejudices

neurons

Prejudices might originate from an innate “behavioral immune system”.

Prejudices have plausibly existed since the origins of humanity. In an evolutionary sense, prejudices might have solved an adaptive problem. Continue reading

A Study of 65,000 Participants Shows How People are Attachted to Their Partners

attachment

How are people attached to their partners?

A study by Mickelson and colleagues (1997) examined 65,000 participants and their attachment styles, with an equal distribution of men and women. Continue reading