Humor Connects People: The Laughing and Liking Principle

laughter

“A day without laughter is a day wasted” – Charlie Chaplin

Humor and laughter are prevalent in most people’s daily lives. According to Treger and colleagues (2013), some estimates suggest that we laugh an average of 18 times a day, often in the presence of others. Continue reading

We Invest So Much Time In Mind Wandering, But How Does It Help Us?

Mind wandering may help us by providing an opportunity for self-reflection that allows us to make meaning of our lives.

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5 Facts About Fear Appeals

SMOKING KILLS: Strong fear appeals only promote change if they are accompanied by messages that make people believe they can succeed in changing their behaviours.

A meta-analysis by Witte & Allen (2000) provides evidence that fear appeals can motivate attitude, intention and behavior changes, as long as they are accompanied by messages that make people believe they can succeed in changing their respective behaviours. Continue reading

You May Empathize More With Attractive Others, Study Shows

New research shows that we are more likely to imitate the behaviors of an attractive person, which reflects the tendency to empathize more with attractive others.

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Study: Feelings of Flow May Lead to Risk-Taking Behavior

extreme sport

Previous research has focused on the many benefits of the experience of flow such as motivation and persistence in learning contexts. Flow has also been associated with positive outcomes regarding experience, well-being, mood and performance. Continue reading

Hindsight Bias: Why We View Events as More Predictable Than They Really Are

hindsight bias

The hindsight bias is one of many cognitive biases, and it is defined as the belief that an event is more predictable after it becomes known than it was before it became known. As a result, people tend to view events are more predictable than they are. Continue reading

Why People Fail to Make Accurate Predictions About Probability

dice

When we solve problems and make decisions and judgments, we very often use mental shortcuts (so-called heuristics). We use these heuristics if we neither have resources nor time to compare all available information before making a choice. In other words, heuristics ease the cognitive load of making a decision. Continue reading

Study: People With Self-Discipline Are Happier

self-discipline

When we think of people with a high self-control, we cannot avoid thinking about how restrained and deprived they might be. Whenever we restrain ourselves, we tend to think that we are missing something. Continue reading