What Types of People Do Extreme Sports?

extreme sport

Kupciw & MacGregor (2012) define high-risk sports as activities that imply a possibility of injury or death, and in order to minimize the risks associated with the sport, specialized equipment is often needed. Continue reading

Study: Feel Bad to Feel Great (Relief Boosts Positive Emotions)

Relief is one of the most common emotions, and it is one of our few basic emotions. Most of our emotions have clear emotional valences. For example, happiness is considered to have a positive emotional valence; anger is considered to have a negative valence; and arousal is considered to have a neutral valence.

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Can Evolution Explain Gender Differences in Jealousy?

Men and women get jealous in different ways.

From an evolutionary perspective, jealousy has solved a problem of reproduction: throughout human history, jealousy has ensured reproductive success. Continue reading

Instincts Might Explain Why People Hold Prejudices

neurons

Prejudices might originate from an innate “behavioral immune system”.

Prejudices have plausibly existed since the origins of humanity. In an evolutionary sense, prejudices might have solved an adaptive problem. Continue reading

The Temporal Doppler Effect: Why the Future Feels so Close and the Past so Distant

time

The Temporal Doppler Effect was illustrated in a recent study by Caruso and colleagues (2013). The Temporal Doppler Effect suggests that the future feels closer than the past.

In their study, they proved that Valentine’s Day seemed closer when it was one week in the future than when it was one week in the past. Continue reading

What is the Evidence for Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences?

multiple intelligence

This post sums up the theory of multiple intelligences and considers it in the light of evidence. So, is it true that people have multiple intelligences?

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The Focusing-Effect: Why We End Up Making the Wrong Decisions

the focusing-effect

Making the right decisions is difficult for many reasons. The focusing-effect is one of them.

When we make decisions, we often get very focused on certain aspects of the decision. This article describes this tendency (=the focusing-effect) in detail and the research surrounding it. Continue reading

10 Factors that Influence Help-Seeking Behaviors

In the book Medical Sociology written by David Mechanic (1978), a thorough theory of help‐seeking behavior is provided. The theory emphasizes individual differences in help-seeking behaviors. In other words, why do some people seek help, while others don’t? Continue reading