Tag Archives: evidence

Anger Impairs People’s Cognitive Scope, Study Shows

The fact that anger can have adverse effects on behavior is evident. When people get angry, they behave in ways that they normally would not do. So, anger seems to impair or even block rational thinking. Continue reading

A 100-Year Old Word Repetition Technique is Effective in Reducing the Impact of (Negative) Words

words

Repeat the word milk for 45 seconds or more (remember to say it out loud), and you will find that the word begins to lose its meaning. It’s called the Milk Milk Milk exercise, and it is just one of many word repetition exercises. Try it yourself before you read any further… did the word milk lose its meaning? Continue reading

Does Your Pursuit of Self-Esteem Damage You?

self-esteem

We tend to define ourselves and our self-worth in terms of our accomplishments.

How do we increase our self-esteem, and how do raise children with high self-esteem? Many self-help books try to answer questions like these. So, the pursuit of self-esteem is a central preoccupation in our modern culture.  Continue reading

Are You In Control? Feelings of Personal Control Are Essential for Mental Health

Feeling out of control?

The belief that one can exert control over stressful events has long been known to help people cope with stress (Taylor, 2012). People like to have control over their lives, and people who have a sense of personal control seem to be better off than those who haven’t.

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What is the Evidence for Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences?

multiple intelligence

This post sums up the theory of multiple intelligences and considers it in the light of evidence. So, is it true that people have multiple intelligences?

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The Focusing-Effect: Why We End Up Making the Wrong Decisions

the focusing-effect

Making the right decisions is difficult for many reasons. The focusing-effect is one of them.

When we make decisions, we often get very focused on certain aspects of the decision. This article describes this tendency (=the focusing-effect) in detail and the research surrounding it. Continue reading