Category Archives: Personality Psychology

Are You In Control? Feelings of Personal Control Are Essential for Mental Health

Feeling out of control?

The belief that one can exert control over stressful events has long been known to help people cope with stress (Taylor, 2012). People like to have control over their lives, and people who have a sense of personal control seem to be better off than those who haven’t.

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8 Scientific Facts About Self-Control

stop smoking

It takes self-control to stop unhealthy habits.

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Study: Narcissists Desire to be Liked by Others, Especially by People With Higher Status

narccisist

Narcissists use behavioural mimicry to make people like them more so that they can maintain their inflated self-view, new research suggests.

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How to Spot a Narcissist

How to Spot a Narcissist

The first hand impression of a narcissist: charming, friendly and seemingly empathic. Beneath the surface: indifferent, arrogant, dominant, self-centered and manipulative.

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Self-Efficacy is Related to Motivation and Performance, Research Shows

Believe and you will achieve.

The degree to which people believe in themselves and their own capabilities is important for their motivation and success.  People’s capabilities are important, but what they believe they can do is at least as important! Continue reading

You May Empathize More With Attractive Others, Study Shows

New research shows that we are more likely to imitate the behaviors of an attractive person, which reflects the tendency to empathize more with attractive others.

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Study: People With Self-Discipline Are Happier

self-discipline

When we think of people with a high self-control, we cannot avoid thinking about how restrained and deprived they might be. Whenever we restrain ourselves, we tend to think that we are missing something. Continue reading

Are We More Connected to our Family and Friends? Yes, Brain Study Shows

friends

A brain study by Beckes and colleagues (2013) shows how familiarity increases empathy, making the boundary between self and other less clear.

The researchers used a fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging) technique to examine the participants’ brain activities in the areas that are thought to be involved in responses to threat. Continue reading