Why Do People Shop Impulsively?

impulsive shopping

What can explain a person’s tendency to shop impulsively? Personality, gender, age, and sensitivity to reward may explain it, research shows.

A study by Bratko and colleagues (2013) examined the relationship between personality and impulsive shopping. The study shows that personality can explain at least some of the difference in impulsive shopping behaviour. Continue reading

Do You Become Easily Overwhelmed? Perhaps You Are a Highly Sensitive Person

sensitive

Some people are more sensitive than others.

A study by Aron & Aron (1997) established that some people are highly sensitive because they have a high sensitivity in sensory-processing, which means that they become easily aroused and overwhelmed by external stimuli. Continue reading

Study: Happy People are More Likely to Steal than People With Neutral Emotions

thief

New research by Vincent and colleagues (2013) has come up with a rather interesting finding about the tendency to commit theft. The authors conducted two studies (experiments). The first study showed that individuals who experience positive emotions steal more often than individuals who experience neutral emotions. Continue reading

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A Life Course Metaphor (Quote)

river

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The Fine Distinction Between Personality Disorders and Clinical Syndromes (DSM-IV)

personality disorder

How are personality disorders different from clinical syndromes? I have tried to sum up some general, historical assumptions on this issue.

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Gender Differences in the Experience of Emotions

emotions

A meta-analysis by Else-Quest and colleagues (2012) examined many of the stereotypes about men’s and women’s emotions. The stereotypes hold that women experience more guilt, shame, and embarrassment, and men typically experience more pride. But is that true? Continue reading

Gender-Typed Behaviors are Linked to Depressive Symptoms, Low Self-Esteem, and Poor Friendship Quality in Boys

Gender-typed behaviors (GT) and stereotypes are common. For example, boys play with automobiles and girls play with dulls, and these behaviors are related to boy and girl identities, respectively.

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The Power of a Social Purpose (Judgmental Bias)

mountain

The burden of wearing a heavy backpack is lessened when a social purpose is given. The hills don’t look as steep.

A study by Durgin and colleagues (2009) finds that the burden of wearing a heavy backpack is lessened when a social purpose is given in form of social demands.

In other words, we perceive the burden as less burdensome, when a social purpose is given. In this way, a purpose contributes to a judgmental bias of the burden. Continue reading